State and city officials like to tout investments made in pedestrian safety, with grand plans such as Toward Zero offering a path forward. These efforts have not led to fewer pedestrian deaths. In fact, that figure has gone up.

The number of people on foot killed in traffic crashes last year rose, climbing from 117 to 133, according to a report from the Baltimore Sun. The problem runs deeper than that, however. The one-year jump only begins to scratch the surface

How dangerous is it for pedestrians?

Many people do not fully grasp just how risky simply walking around the city can be. Consider this: In 2018, 68 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes. Those individuals accounted for 30% of all traffic fatalities in the Baltimore region that year, and nearly half of pedestrian traffic deaths in the entire state.

Unmentioned are the hundreds of others who suffered injuries due to being struck by a vehicle. These crashes can lead to expensive medical bills, time away from work, and unnecessary pain and suffering.

Everyone has a responsibility to act safely

While pedestrians should pay attention when out and about, motorists also have an obligation to drive in a way that does not put others at risk. Unfortunately, this often does not happen. The Baltimore Sun highlighted key driver behaviors that can result in serious or deadly crashes:

  • Aggressive driving
  • Speeding
  • Driving impaired
  • Driving distracted

All of these behaviors are conscious decisions. If you are injured in a car crash, do not assume the insurance company’s hasty offer is enough. A negligent driver that is responsible for a crash can be held accountable, with medical bills, lost wages and other damages going to the injured party.

While nothing can undo what happened, rightful compensation does allow victims to focus on the future, not fret about the past.